Learning from the Leaders in Patient Experience

Learning from the Leaders in Patient Experience

Posted by  | Organizational and Cultural Change, Patient-Centered Care

Hospitals across the country are searching for ways to create the "always positive" patient experience. For example, we want our patients to tell us that their pain was always addressed, that clinicians were always responsive to their needs and that our communications at discharge time always helped prepare them to take care of themselves once(...)

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Blood Clots Show Limits of Quality Care Penalties

Blood Clots Show Limits of Quality Care Penalties

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Preventing Patient Harm

In the world of medicine, blood clots during hospitalization have become synonymous with imperfect care. As many as 600,000 patients per year experience a blood clot, and more than 100,000 die as a result, accounting for between 5 and 10 percent of hospital deaths. Regulatory agencies have taken clots as signals that safety and quality(...)

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Supporting ‘Second Victims’ with Emotional First Aid

Supporting ‘Second Victims’ with Emotional First Aid

Posted by  | Organizational and Cultural Change, Preventing Patient Harm

She was a newly minted Johns Hopkins Hospital pediatric nurse — let's call her Mary — but she was already unsure if she had chosen the right career path. She had inserted an intravenous line into a young patient's arm, and there had been an infiltrate, a pooling of IV fluid under the child's skin that indicated(...)

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Blood Clots: The Least-Appreciated Complication of Hospital Care?

Blood Clots: The Least-Appreciated Complication of Hospital Care?

Posted by  | Patient-Centered Care, Preventing Patient Harm

If you were undergoing a surgical procedure, would you ever think to refuse the antibiotics your physician had ordered to prevent an infection? For most hospitalized patients, that would be unfathomable. And yet, when it comes to another common complication with a far greater death toll than surgical-site infections, both patients and health care professionals(...)

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Patient Safety and Quality Champions Grow into Leaders

Patient Safety and Quality Champions Grow into Leaders

Posted by  | Organizational and Cultural Change, Preventing Patient Harm

For years, physician assistant Stephanie Figueroa has worked with our Emergency Department and the sickle cell care team to improve the treatment of patients with this disease who arrive with acute pain crisis. When beds were unavailable in the busy adult ED, these patients might spend hours in excruciating pain before our staff were able(...)

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What’s Your Theory? Bringing Rigor to Local Quality Improvement Projects

What’s Your Theory? Bringing Rigor to Local Quality Improvement Projects

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Organizational and Cultural Change

For a moment, consider that you work at a primary care clinic, and your team needs to improve performance on annual foot exams on patients with diabetes — a critical step to prevent foot ulcers and amputations. At your monthly meeting, staff members enthusiastically suggest solutions, such as using robocalls to urge patients to schedule appointments(...)

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Can Hospitals Police Themselves to Avoid Too-Risky Surgeries?

Can Hospitals Police Themselves to Avoid Too-Risky Surgeries?

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Preventing Patient Harm

Imagine you were seeking major surgery, and the hospital's consent form contained this surprise statement, which you were asked to initial: "I understand that this surgeon and hospital have not performed this procedure in the last 12 months. As such, I accept the greater risk of complications and even death." It's hard to believe that(...)

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