Measurement of Safety and Quality

A Clear-Eyed Approach to Reducing Costly Health Care Regulations

A Clear-Eyed Approach to Reducing Costly Health Care Regulations

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality

Johns Hopkins ophthalmologist Oliver Schein has found a simple way to save a half a billion dollars a year from our country's health-care bill, with no negative effect on patient health. The only thing standing in the way is a stubborn government requirement. Seventeen years ago, Dr. Schein and colleagues published a study finding that(...)

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More Science, Less Sausage-Making Needed for Hospital Quality Measures

More Science, Less Sausage-Making Needed for Hospital Quality Measures

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality

If you understand statistics and possess the intestinal fortitude to examine a ranking methodology, you will recognize that it involves ingredients that have to be recombined, repackaged and renamed. It's messy, like sausage-making. This is not to say that the end product — hospital rankings — are distasteful. Patients deserve valid, transparent and timely information(...)

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5 Lessons for Creating Health Care Performance Dashboards

5 Lessons for Creating Health Care Performance Dashboards

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality

In recent years, Johns Hopkins Medicine has grown increasingly sophisticated in its use of patient safety and quality dashboards, not just to spur internal improvement efforts but also to increase transparency with the public about our performance. In 2013, we launched an internal dashboard for our health system’s 41,000 employees, sharing our performance data on(...)

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Seeking the Right Stuff for Teams: In the Hospital or Distant Space

Seeking the Right Stuff for Teams: In the Hospital or Distant Space

Posted by  | Designing Safer Systems, Measurement of Safety and Quality, Organizational and Cultural Change

Wanted: Talented, highly driven individuals to take on multiyear work assignment with potential for benefiting humankind. Requires the highest levels of technical skill, teamwork and adaptability. Must be able to tolerate social isolation, mental and physical fatigue, demanding and uneven work schedules, days and nights away from home. Risk of depression and burnout. Must be(...)

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Patient Safety at 15: How Much Have We Grown?

Patient Safety at 15: How Much Have We Grown?

Posted by  | Designing Safer Systems, Measurement of Safety and Quality, Organizational and Cultural Change, Preventing Patient Harm

Fifteen-year anniversaries often come and go without fuss, overlooked in favor of those we can mark in full decades. Yet recently, at Johns Hopkins and nationally, we've crossed that mark for a couple of events in patient safety that merit both celebration and reflection. In January 2001, a series of lapses at Johns Hopkins led(...)

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The Surgeon Scorecard and the Need for Measurement Standards

The Surgeon Scorecard and the Need for Measurement Standards

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Preventing Patient Harm

Most of us would agree that there aren't enough valid and meaningful health care quality measures to guide patients' choices of hospitals and physicians. While the federal government has steadily expanded the number of publicly available measures on its Hospital Compare website, it still falls short of what many patients, payers and providers would like.(...)

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Blood Clots Show Limits of Quality Care Penalties

Blood Clots Show Limits of Quality Care Penalties

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Preventing Patient Harm

In the world of medicine, blood clots during hospitalization have become synonymous with imperfect care. As many as 600,000 patients per year experience a blood clot, and more than 100,000 die as a result, accounting for between 5 and 10 percent of hospital deaths. Regulatory agencies have taken clots as signals that safety and quality(...)

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