A cure for ‘initiative fatigue’?

Posted by  | Preventing Patient Harm

Frontline caregivers across the United States—and in many other countries, no doubt—are bombarded by multiple quality improvement (QI) projects. A clinical unit might simultaneously be engaged in efforts to reduce readmissions, eliminate hospital-acquired infections and other complications, increase hand-hygiene compliance, improve performance on core measures, and enhance the patient experience. The demands brought by participating(...)

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Re-engineering health care for safety and cost savings

Posted by  | Designing Safer Systems, Preventing Patient Harm

Despite spending $800 billion on technology last year, health care productivity is flat and preventable patient harm remains the third leading cause of death in the U.S. One reason is that health care is grossly under-engineered: medical devices don't talk to each other, treatments are not specified and ensured, and outcomes are largely assumed rather(...)

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A blueprint for high reliability

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Organizational and Cultural Change, Preventing Patient Harm

Across health care, organizations constantly struggle with the challenge of achieving patient safety and quality successes on a large scale—across a hospital or network of hospitals. Too often, they are doomed at the start, because staff don’t even know what the goals are. In other cases, staff have limited capacity to carry out improvement work(...)

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Rethinking how we think about preventing harm

Posted by  | Designing Safer Systems, Measurement of Safety and Quality, Preventing Patient Harm

Last week the Armstrong Institute, along with our partners at the World Health Organization, had the privilege of hosting more than 200 clinicians, patient advocates, health care leaders and policy makers for our inaugural Forum on Emerging Topics in Patient Safety in Baltimore. The event featured presentations by international experts in a dozen different industries,(...)

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A powerful idea from the nuclear industry

Posted by  | Designing Safer Systems, Measurement of Safety and Quality, Preventing Patient Harm

Where health care has fallen short in significantly improving quality, our peers in other high-risk industries have thrived. Perhaps we can adapt and learn from their lessons. For example, health care can learn much from the nuclear power industry, which has markedly improved its safety track record over the last two decades since peer-review programs were(...)

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Patient Safety Summit: Four Years of Advancing the Science

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Patient-Centered Care, Preventing Patient Harm

At Johns Hopkins Medicine, we recently held our fourth annual Patient Safety Summit, a daylong gathering in which faculty and staff from across our health system share their work to reduce patient harm and foster a culture of safety. The event has quickly become a tradition, with more than 425 participants flocking annually to our(...)

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Quality Measures: An SEC for Health Care?

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Preventing Patient Harm

If you have ever tried to choose a physician or hospital based on publicly available performance measures, you may have felt overwhelmed and confused by what you found online. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Joint Commission, the Leapfrog Group, and the National Committee for Quality(...)

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Free online course in patient safety

Posted by  | Preventing Patient Harm

If you follow the world of higher education, you have heard of MOOCs—massive online open courses. Open to anyone, anywhere, these free classes can attract tens of thousands of students whose hunger to learn outweighs the fact that no credits are typically awarded. With many elite universities now offering MOOCs, it’s a movement that is(...)

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