Organizational and Cultural Change

Patient Safety and Quality Champions Grow into Leaders

Patient Safety and Quality Champions Grow into Leaders

Posted by  | Organizational and Cultural Change, Preventing Patient Harm

For years, physician assistant Stephanie Figueroa has worked with our Emergency Department and the sickle cell care team to improve the treatment of patients with this disease who arrive with acute pain crisis. When beds were unavailable in the busy adult ED, these patients might spend hours in excruciating pain before our staff were able(...)

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What’s Your Theory? Bringing Rigor to Local Quality Improvement Projects

What’s Your Theory? Bringing Rigor to Local Quality Improvement Projects

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Organizational and Cultural Change

For a moment, consider that you work at a primary care clinic, and your team needs to improve performance on annual foot exams on patients with diabetes — a critical step to prevent foot ulcers and amputations. At your monthly meeting, staff members enthusiastically suggest solutions, such as using robocalls to urge patients to schedule appointments(...)

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To Make Hospital Quality a Priority, Take a Page from Finance

To Make Hospital Quality a Priority, Take a Page from Finance

Posted by  | Measurement of Safety and Quality, Organizational and Cultural Change

When you are a patient at a hospital, you want to know that the executives who run that facility put the safety and quality of care above all other concerns. Encouragingly, more of them are saying that safety is indeed their number-one priority—a fitting answer given that preventable patient harm may claim more than 400,000(...)

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Hospital-acquired infections: How do we reach zero?

Posted by  | Organizational and Cultural Change, Preventing Patient Harm

This week, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued two reports that are simultaneously scary and encouraging. First, the scary news: A national survey conducted in 2011 found that one in every 25 U.S. hospital patients experienced a healthcare-associated infection. That’s 648,000 patients with a combined 722,000 infections. About 75,000 of those patients(...)

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